The Japanese government said it would start releasing radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean in two years.a small boat in a harbor: Fishing boats are seen at Ukedo port with a backdrop of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan, on Tuesday.© Provided by New York Daily News Fishing boats are seen at Ukedo port with a backdrop of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan, on Tuesday.Fishing boats are seen at Ukedo port with a backdrop of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Namie town, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan, on Tuesday. (Yusuke Ogata/)The announcement has already been met with derision from the public as well as the country’s fishing industry. Neighboring countries are not in favor of the idea either.The Fukushima plant was damaged during an earthquake and subsequent tsunami in 2011, which caused the plant’s reactors to start leaking their cooling water. That water has been stored at the plant since but it is expected to reach capacity next year.Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said the ocean release was the most realistic option and was a necessary step to complete the decades-long decommissioning of the Fukushima plant. He said the government would work to make sure the water is safe and to help local agriculture, fisheries and tourism.a large body of water with a city in the background: This Feb. 13, 2021, aerial photo shows Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Okuma town.© Provided by New York Daily News This Feb. 13, 2021, aerial photo shows Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Okuma town.This Feb. 13, 2021, aerial photo shows Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Okuma town.Experts are mixed over whether or not the release of radioactive water in such large amounts, even if the amount of radiation is small, will harm marine life. The current radiation levels in the “treated” water, however, are unknown.Tokyo Electric Power Co., the operator of the plant, said it needs the storage space being taken up by 1.37 million tons of water tanks to house debris from further decommissioning the physical structure of the Fukushima plant. The large tanks also risk being damaged or destroyed if another earthquake and tsunami hit the area.a group of people standing in front of a crowd: People chant slogans against government's decision to start releasing massive amounts of treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, during a rally outside the prime minister's office in Tokyo on Tuesday.© Provided by New York Daily News People chant slogans against government’s decision to start releasing massive amounts of treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, during a rally outside the prime minister’s office in Tokyo on Tuesday.People chant slogans against government’s decision to start releasing massive amounts of treated radioactive water from the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea, during a rally outside the prime minister’s office in Tokyo on Tuesday. (Eugene Hoshiko/)Reports estimate that about 70% of the radioactive water in storage will need to be filtered and diluted with seawater before it can be released. According to a preliminary estimate, gradually and safely releasing the water will take nearly 40 years but will be completed before the plant is fully decommissioned.Both South Korea and China have raised concerns about the plan, calling it “absolutely unacceptable” and “extremely irresponsible,” respectively.