Jan 312011
 

Million Man March Needs Internet Connections


  1. 20 Ways to Circumvent the Egyptians Governments’ Internet Block
  2. ( Should read By: @AnonymousRx )
  3. 01] Nour DSL is still working in Egypt, Dial up with 0777 7776 or 07777 666
  4. 02] IP addresses for social media: pass on to people in #Egypt: Twitter: 128.242.240.52. Facebook: 69.63.189.34
  5. 03] How to circumvent the communications blackout in #Egypt http://slink.us?lr Arabic
  6. 04] #hamradio frequencies for #egypt http://slink.us?ls PLEASE SPREAD IRC: http://slink.us?lt
  7. 05] Ham Radio Software software for PC, Mac and Linux http://www.hamsphere.com Communicate w/ #egypt
  8. 06] TOR Bridge 189.129.67.78:443 04FD6AE46E95F1E46B5264528C48EA84DB10CAC4
  9. 07] There is an Old DSL Dialup 24564600
  10. 08] Send SMS reports to +1 949 209 7559 and they will retweet for you. Please spread to those in #Egypt on battlefield
  11. 09] #Egypt hams are on 7.050-7.200 MHz LSB
  12. 10] Egypt Gov only blocking by DNS. So for Twitter try 128.242.245.148 Facebook 69.63.189.11 Proxy
  13. 11] VPN Server http://texnomic.com/url/2L is now stable and open for FREE to ALL
  14. 12] Help the Egypt Revolutionaries by overcoming the Firewall https://www.accessnow.org/proxy-cloud
  15. 13] 0m band, 7.050-7.20­0 MHz LSB, 318.5 degrees (northwest­/north from cairo) Ham Radio Operators
  16. 14] We are now providing dialup modem service at +46850009990. user/pass: telecomix/telecomix (only for #egypt, respect that PLEASE!).
  17. 15] People of Egypt ONLY! Use this dial-up provided by friends in France to go online: +33172890150 (login ‘toto’ password ‘toto’)
  18. 16] FREE VPN Server to bypass ANY Blockage on ANY ADSL or Cell Network. Domain: Cloud.Texnomic.com User: FreeEgypt Pass: #Jan25
  19. 17] Third party apps: Tweetdeck http://www.tweetdeck.com/ & Hootsuite http://hootsuite.com/ still work for updating Twitter
  20. 18] I2P anonymizing network http://www.i2p2.de/
  21. 19] RetroShare: secure communications with friends http://retroshare.sourceforge.net/
  22. Follow @An ( Should read 20] Follow @AnonymousRx )
  23. Ask what you can do to help when in the chat channel, anonymous members are always willing to help out new members!

Updated 1/31/2011

01] Nour DSL is still working in Egypt, Dial up with 0777 7776 or 07777 666

02] IP addresses for social media: pass on to people in #Egypt: Twitter: 128.242.240.52. Facebook: 69.63.189.34

03] How to circumvent the communications blackout in #Egypt http://slink.us?lr Arabic

04] #hamradio frequencies for #egypt http://slink.us?ls PLEASE SPREAD IRC: http://slink.us?lt

Update #2

Google has collaborated up with new acquisition SayNow and Twitter to offer Egyptians a way to Tweet with the use of their phones.

According to the official Google blog, some overtime this weekend from various engineers will now allow Egyptians to Tweet via phone. Recent acquisition SayNow will enable people to use Twitter using a voice connection, and the feature is already live. You can try it out by call the numbers below:

  • (US) 16504194196
  • (Italy) 390662207294
  • (Bahrain) 97316199855

This will instantly post Tweets along with the #Egypt hashtag. You can find the Tweets (which are already piling up) here, as well as listen to the voice recordings themselves on links within the posts.

A voice message link from gheseh2000 reported:

“The government is spreading rumors of fear and of burglary and of violence and these are all rumors we have been out in the streets…nothing is happening…there are incidents of theft and burglary by the police themselves…we are standing together in solidarity.”

Some phone service was restored this weekend, giving citizens access to the Speak2Tweet application. For the time being, this operation is allowing at least some Egyptians communication with the rest of the globe and giving outsiders a small window in as the protests continue to unfold.


Elizabeth Woyke

Elizabeth Woyke

Mobilize

Chart: Egyptian Text Messages Still Largely Blocked

Jan. 31 2011

While Egypt’s cellular networks appear to be back online following its government’s shutdown of

Data from Sybase. “MT” means “mobile-terminated”. Click the image to enlarge.

Internet services last week, an analysis of outbound text messages shows that mobile messaging services are still largely blocked.

The findings could have ramifications for the ongoing unrest in Egypt. The disruption of the country’s mainstream Internet and cellular networks has inspired Egyptians to seek out alternative communication methods.

The text messaging data comes from Sybase 365, a California-based provider of mobile messaging and commerce services that was acquired by business software giant SAP last year. Sybase says it has been monitoring Egypt’s text messaging (also known as SMS) traffic from data centers in Paris and the U.S. The company says it can see traffic that is being sent from wireless carriers active in Egypt, including Etisalat, Mobinil and Vodafone, to U.S. carriers.

A snapshot of Egypt’s SMS traffic late last week shows a dramatic slowdown in the evening of Jan. 27 that continued until at least 8 pm on Jan. 28 (as measured in universal or Greenwich Mean Time). Two of Egypt’s major operators, Mobinil and Vodafone, appeared to be fully blocked while Etisalat seemed to be carrying a small amount of text message traffic.

While the chart (above) only tracks trends through the night of Jan. 28, Sybase spokesman Bill Dudley says the company continues to watch the Egyptian carriers and the trend remains the same. (In the chart, “MT” stands for “Mobile-Terminated,” meaning traffic that originated in Egypt to a selection of U.S. carriers. Sybase says the U.S. carriers it is observing are a representative sampling.)

For a four-hour period early Saturday morning (3 a.m. to 7 a.m. Eastern Standard Time), Etisalat managed to send text messages. Since that time, however, international SMS traffic from Egypt to the outside world has been “virtually nil,” wrote Dudley in an email to Forbes.

Sybase’s data might seem to contradict recent news that mobile networks within Egypt are back online. Dudley says that while that may be true, “significant gaps” in service still exist, largely because of obstructed Internet access. “Much of Egypt’s international SMS traffic likely rides on secure tunnels through some of the Internet connections that have been blocked,” concluded Dudley.

One remaining option may be to send text messages via satellite phones. The challenge, of course, is that very few people own the pricey devices, which generally cost around $1,000.

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